My Credit Card Is Lost or Stolen – What Do I Do Now?

Brendan Harkness

Brendan Harkness

Updated Apr 18, 2017

A stolen credit card may sound like a nightmare, but, as long as you notice the lost card and act quickly, this situation should be no cause for alarm.

Your liability is limited by law, and the major credit card payment processors all have $0 fraud liability policies, meaning that you won’t have to pay for fraudulent charges as long as you act responsibly.

So, if you’ve just realized that your credit card is lost or stolen, don’t panic: there are some simple steps you can take to remedy the problem.

Report Your Card as Lost or Stolen

The first thing to do is report your lost card to your card issuer, and, if you think your card has been stolen and used, to report the fraudulent use to the credit reporting agencies, creating a fraud alert.

It is best to do this within 2 days, though some credit card issuers are more forgiving than others. Usually, you can call the number on the back of your card to contact your issuer.

Since your card is gone, here is a collection of popular issuers and networks, with the phone numbers you need and the individual lost/stolen card reporting website as well.

Credit Card Issuers

Credit Card Issuer Website Phone Number
Bank Of America Bank Of America Lost/Stolen Card Reporting 1-800-732-9194
Barclaycard Barclaycard Account FAQ  1-877-523-0478
Capital One Capital One Contact Page

1-800-427-9428

1-800-239-7054

Chase Chase Fraud Resources Page

 1-800-432-3137 (Personal Credit Cards)

1-888-269-8690 (Business Credit Cards)

Citi Citi Contact Resources Page 1-800-950-5114
USAA USAA Contact Resources 1-800-531-8722

Payment Processors

Payment Processor Website Phone Number
Visa Visa Lost/Stolen Card Reporting 1-800-847-2911
MasterCard MasterCard Lost/Stolen Card FAQ  1-800-627-8372
American Express  American Express Lost Card/Account Help 1-800-992-3404
Discover Discover Lost/Stolen Card FAQ  1-800-347-2683

Credit Bureaus

Credit Bureau Website Phone Number
Experian Experian Credit Fraud Resources Page 1-888-397-3742
Equifax Equifax Credit Fraud Resources Page  1-800-627-8372
TransUnion TransUnion Credit Fraud Resources Page  1-800-680-7289

What Happens after I Report My Lost Card?

After your report your card as lost or stolen, your issuer will cancel the card and then mail you a new one, with a new account number. Usually, this process will have no effect on your credit report.

When a Re-Issued Card Could Affect Your Credit Report

Typically, a re-issued card will be reported to the credit reporting agencies exactly as the previous card was reported, with the same credit limit, balance, and history. In some cases, however, a credit card issuer could report the re-issued card as a new account, with a new open date.

This will decrease the average length of your credit card history, can have a negative impact on your credit report because the FICO® Score counts average length of credit history as 15% of your total score.

To be safe, keep an eye on your credit reports after you get a card re-issued to see if you are affected by this. Contact your credit card issuer if you are concerned about this and to possibly get the situation reversed.

The Fair Credit Billing Act Limits Your Liability

Under the Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA), cardholders are protected from having to pay the full cost of fraudulent credit card charges.

The FCBA limits your liability to $50, which means that’s the maximum amount you could owe the bank if someone steals your card and uses it without your permission before you’ve reported the card stolen. If you report the card stolen before any charges are made you will not be responsible for any of the charges.

Most credit card companies offer $0 liability, which means you won’t owe any money for unauthorized transactions, even if the charges were made before you reported the card stolen.

Remember, debit cards do not have these same protections as credit cards, so if your debit card is stolen you may end up losing money.

 

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