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Chase Ink Business Credit Cards and Co-Branded Chase Business Cards

10 min read
Sean Messier By Sean Messier Sep 24, 2019 | Updated Nov 26, 2019

One of the nation’s foremost credit card issuers, Chase offers a plethora of credit cards that cater to a variety of needs and spending habits. Among this extensive portfolio are six business cards that come complete with their own selection of rewards and perks for small business owners.

Three of these cards fall under the Chase Ink name, which is Chase’s own brand of small business credit cards. The remaining three are co-branded Chase cards that cater heavily to avid travelers who prefer certain brands, as you’ll see below.

Chase Ink Business Credit Cards

Over the years, Chase has offered several different types of Ink business cards. Currently, it offers three Ink cards for small business owners to earn rewards on business expenses.

Card Annual Fee Rewards
Ink Business Unlimited℠ Credit Card (Review) $0
  • 1.5% cash back on every purchase
  • $500 bonus cash back for spending $3,000 in the first 3 months
Ink Business Cash℠ Credit Card (Review) $0
  • 5% cash back on up to $25,000 spent per year on Office supply stores and Internet, cable, and phone services
  • 2% cash back on up to $25,000 spent per year on Gas stations and Restaurants
  • 1% cash back on all other purchases
  • $500 bonus cash back for spending $3,000 in the first 3 months
Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card (Review) $95
  • 3X points per dollar up to $150,000 spent per year on Travel, Shipping, Internet, cable and phone services, and Advertising purchases made with social media sites and search engines
  • 1X point per dollar on all other purchases
  • 80,000 bonus points for spending $5,000 in the first 3 months

 

Ink Business Unlimited℠ Credit Card

Ink Business Unlimited℠ Credit Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelGood
Details
Annual Fee$0
Regular APR14.74% - 20.74% Variable

The Ink Business Unlimited℠ Credit Card (Review) is a general-use business credit card that allows small business owners to earn unlimited cash back rewards at a 1.5% rate without worrying over specific bonus categories. There’s no annual fee, and the card boasts a lengthy intro APR for purchases.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 1.5% cash back on every purchase
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • $500 bonus cash back for spending $3,000 in the first 3 months after account opening
    • Return on spend: 16.67%

Key Features

  • Intro Purchase APR: 0% for 12 months
  • Regular APR: 14.74% - 20.74% Variable
  • Annual fee: $0

Read more in our Review of the Chase Ink Business Unlimited Credit Card

 

Ink Business Cash℠ Credit Card

Ink Business Cash℠ Credit Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelExcellent
Details
Annual Fee$0
Regular APR14.74% - 20.74% Variable

The Ink Business Cash℠ Credit Card (Review) provides cash back on every purchase, offering increased reward rates on select business categories. Just like the Ink Business Unlimited, the Ink Business Cash delivers a nice introductory APR for purchases.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 5% cash back on up to $25,000 spent per year at:
    • Office supply stores
    • Internet, cable, and phone services
  • 2% cash back on up to $25,000 spent per year at:
    • Gas stations
    • Restaurants
  • 1% cash back on all other purchases
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • $500 bonus cash back for spending $3,000 in the first 3 months after account opening
    • Return on spend: 16.67%

Key Features

  • Intro Purchase APR: 0% for 12 months
  • Regular APR: 14.74% - 20.74% Variable
  • Annual fee: $0

Read more in our Review of the Chase Ink Business Cash Credit Card

 

Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card

Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelExcellent
Details
Annual Fee$95
Regular APR17.49% - 22.49% Variable

Unlike the previous two Chase Ink business credit cards, the Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card (Review) carries an annual fee. But for the additional cost, the Ink Business Preferred card delivers a different rewards program with a higher spending limit, a hefty signup bonus, and a few perks that set this card apart.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 3X points per dollar on up to $150,000 spent per year for:
    • Travel
    • Shipping purchases
    • Internet, cable, and phone services
    • Advertising purchases made with social media sites and search engines
  • 1X point per dollar on all other purchases
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • 80,000 bonus points for spending $5,000 in the first 3 months after account opening
    • Value: $800–$1,600 (assuming 1–2 cents per point)
    • Return on spend: 16–32%

Key Features

  • 25% point bonus when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards for travel expenses
  • Point transfer at a 1:1 rate to a variety of frequent traveler programs, including partners like JetBlue, United, Marriott Bonvoy, and World of Hyatt
  • Earn 20,000 bonus points for referrals (up to 100,000 points per year)
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • Annual fee$95

Read more in our Review of the Chase Ink Business Preferred Credit Card

Chase Co-Branded Airline Credit Cards

Aside from the Chase Ink business credit cards, there are also a few co-branded Chase credit cards designed with business spending in mind.

Card Annual Fee Rewards
United℠ Explorer Business Card $95
  • 2X miles per dollar on United Airlines tickets, Restaurants, Gas stations, and Office supply stores
  • 1X mile per dollar on all other purchases
  • 50,000 bonus miles for spending $5,000 in the first 3 months
  • 50,000 bonus miles for spending $25,000 in the first 6 months
United MileagePlus® Club Business Card $450
  • 2X miles per dollar on United Airlines tickets
  • 1.5X miles per dollar on all other purchases
  • $100 statement credit after your first purchase
Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Credit Card $99
  • 2X points per dollar on Southwest Airlines and Rapid Rewards Hotel and Car Partners
  • 1X point per dollar on all other purchases
  • 60,000 bonus points for spending $3,000 in the first 3 months
Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Credit Card $199
  • 3X points per dollar on Southwest Airlines and Rapid Rewards Hotel and Car Partners
  • 2X points per dollar on Social media and search engine advertising, Internet, Cable phone services
  • 1X point per dollar on all other purchases
  • 70,000 bonus points for spending $5,000 in the first 3 months

United Airlines

United℠ Explorer Business Card

United℠ Explorer Business Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelGood
Details
Annual Fee$95
Regular APR17.49% - 24.49% Variable

The United℠ Explorer Business Card is a rewards card that earns miles in a variety of categories, including tickets purchased from United. It’s not as rewarding as its premium counterpart, the United MileagePlus® Club Business Card, but its annual fee is considerably lower.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 2X miles per dollar for:
    • United Airlines tickets
    • Restaurants
    • Gas stations
    • Office supply stores
  • 1X mile per dollar on all other purchases
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • 50,000 bonus miles for spending $5,000 in the first 3 months after account opening
    • Value: $500–$750 (assuming 1–1.5 cents per point)
    • Return on spend: 10–15%
  • 50,000 bonus miles for spending $25,000 in the first 6 months after account opening
    • Value: $500–$750 (assuming 1–1.5 cents per point)
    • Return on spend: 2–3%

Key Features

  • Earn 10,000 bonus miles per year for spending $25,000 on your card
  • United MileagePlus member status: Basic MileagePlus member status earns 5X miles per dollar on United tickets, in addition to the miles earned from the card
  • United Club Passes: Two one-time passes per year to United Club airport lounges
  • Travel perks: Priority boarding privileges, free first checked bags, Luxury Hotel & Resort Collection privileges
  • Annual fee$95

 

United MileagePlus® Club Business Card

United MileagePlus® Club Business Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelGood
Details
Annual Fee$450
Regular APR18.24%–25.24% Variable
Apply Now

securely on the issuer's website

With a fairly hefty $450 annual fee, it stands to reason that the United MileagePlus® Club Business Card serves up an impressive selection of benefits on top of its travel rewards program. Even so, its steep cost makes it a business card that’s best suited for the very frequent United flyer.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 2X miles per dollar on United Airlines tickets
  • 1.5X miles per dollar on all other purchases
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • $100 statement credit after your first purchase

Key Features

  • United Club membership: Free access to all United Club locations and participating Star Alliance-affiliated lounges worldwide for you and two guests (up to a $550 value per year)
  • Travel perks: Premier Access travel services, free first and second checked bags, access to the Hertz Gold Plus Rewards Presidents Circle, Luxury Hotel & Resort Collection privileges, and more
  • Annual fee$450

 

Southwest Airlines

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Credit Card

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Credit Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelGood
Details
Annual Fee$99
Regular APR17.49% - 24.49% Variable

Designed for business travelers who prefer to fly Southwest, the Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Business Credit Card earns reward points on every purchase, with additional earnings for certain categories.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 2X points per dollar at:
    • Southwest Airlines
    • Rapid Rewards Hotel and Car Rental Partners
  • 1X point per dollar on all other purchases
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • 60,000 bonus points for spending $3,000 in the first 3 months after account opening
    • Value: $600–$900 (assuming 1–1.5 cents per point)
    • Return on spend: 20–30%

Key Features

  • Yearly bonus: 6,000 bonus points after cardmember anniversary
  • Travel perks: First and second checked bags are free, no blackout dates on award flights
  • Annual fee$99

 

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Credit Card

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Credit Card

Our rating
Min. credit levelGood
Details
Annual Fee$199
Regular APR17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Apply Now

securely on the issuer's website

A higher-end card for business travelers, the Southwest Rapid Rewards® Performance Business Credit Card comes with a few benefits you won’t get with the Premier Business card, although the annual fee is about twice as high. Its anniversary bonus, which kicks off after your first year as a cardholder, is also a touch higher.

Rewards

Spending Rewards
  • 3X points per dollar at:
    • Southwest Airlines
    • Rapid Rewards Hotel and Car Rental Partners
  • 2X points per dollar for:
    • Social media and search engine advertising
    • Internet
    • Cable
    • Phone Services
  • 1X point per dollar on all other purchases
Introductory Bonus Offer
  • 70,000 bonus points for spending $5,000 in the first 3 months after account opening
    • Value: $700–$1,050 (assuming 1–1.5 cents per point)
    • Return on spend: 14–21%

Key Features

  • Yearly bonus: 9,000 bonus points after cardmember anniversary
  • Travel perks: Global Entry/TSA PreCheck application fee credit, four upgraded boardings per year, 365 $8 credits for in-flight WiFi per year
  • Annual fee$199

Chase Business Credit Card Features

Chase business credit cards serve up a healthy mix of features that can prove useful for business purposes. Not all of the Visa benefits are available with every card, though, so make sure you do your research to determine which business card is right for you.

  • Free employee cards: Every Chase business credit card offers complimentary employee cards, each of which will earn rewards for the primary account.
  • Build business credit: Chase will generally report positive account activity on business credit cards to Dun & Bradstreet, Equifax Business, and Experian Business, as well as Small Business Financial Exchange, allowing you to bolster your business credit scores. Negative activity will be reported to the regular consumer credit bureaus.
  • Visa Signature benefits: Chase business cards typically come as either Visa Signature or Visa Signature Business. Visa provides a $0 fraud liability policy for these cards, along with shopping and travel protections which may include purchase protection, extended warranties, auto rental collision damage waivers, and lost luggage reimbursement.
  • Fraud protection: This Chase-provided protection offers real-time transaction monitoring to help keep fraud at bay.
If you’re a business owner looking for a new card, Chase might have something that works for you. To explore other options, check out our favorite business credit cards.

Combining Chase Cards for More Valuable Rewards

While Chase often refers to the rewards earned by the Ink Unlimited and Ink Cash cards as “cash back,” the reality is that all three Chase Ink cards technically earn Ultimate Rewards points. So, when you’re earning 5% “cash back” with the Ink Cash, for example, you’re actually earning 5X Ultimate Rewards points per dollar.

Chase calls it “cash back” in those situations because the standard redemption for those cards is 1 cent per point. So 5X points per dollar would be equivalent to 5% cash back. But you’ll find that you’re actually accruing points in your rewards pool, rather than cash back.

This is an important distinction, because Chase allows cardholders to transfer points between cards, which presents a great opportunity to maximize the value your rewards.

It’s a feature that’s given rise to such strategies as the Chase Trifecta, which involves harnessing the advantages of three different Chase credit cards. In this case, you’d combine two cards with strong rewards programs, like the Ink Unlimited and Ink Cash, as well as another card that can provide a better value for those rewards, such as the Ink Preferred.

Here’s the idea:

  1. Imagine you’re an Ink Cash cardholder. You rack up a bunch of points, say 50,000, after $10,000 of spending at the 5X rewards rate. You could also earn points with the Ink Unlimited during this step.
  2. Next, you transfer the rewards to a card like the Ink Business Preferred, which will give you a bit more value and flexibility when it comes time to redeem your points.
  3. With the Ink Preferred, you have a couple different good options. One is to redeem those points through the Chase Ultimate Rewards travel portal to take advantage of the card’s 25% point bonus, giving you 1.25 cents per point. That means your 50,000-point balance would be worth $625, rather than $500. That’d effectively give you a return of 6.25% cash back when spending at the 5X rate, instead of just 5%, which is quite strong.
  4. Or, you could transfer your 50,000 points to an airline or hotel loyalty program, a benefit that’s afforded by the Ink Preferred. You could potentially get 2 cents per point like that, or, if you find a good offer, even more. At 2 cents per point, those 50,000 points would be worth $1,000, and your cash back equivalent when spending in the 5X categories of the Ink Cash card would be a whopping 10%. Sweet deal, right?

This system applies to Chase consumer cards, as well, so there’s no need to feel left out if you’re not using business cards.

A Brief History of Chase

The fearsome financial force now known as JPMorgan Chase & Co. (which we’ll call Chase from here on out) features an exciting history and an extensive family tree that extends well over 200 years. But while it’s now a major player in global finance, the massive company as it appears today was shaped through countless mergers and acquisitions, and it combines the collective knowledge, innovation, and reputation of more than 1,200 predecessor institutions.

Chase is currently America’s largest bank, with a whopping $2.6 trillion in total assets.

The Earliest Days

The earliest Chase predecessor, The Bank of The Manhattan Company, formed in September of 1799 under its parent, The Manhattan Company. The latter organization was founded by noted politicians Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. Its task? Provide Manhattan with “pure and wholesome water.”

But a unique loophole within The Manhattan Company’s charter allowed the business to do a bit more. The provision, which allowed the company to “use any of its capital stock not required in the water business ‘in the purchase of public stock or in any other monied transactions or operations not inconsistent with the Constitution and laws of the United States,'” indirectly allowed The Manhattan Company to engage in banking operations.

And so The Bank of The Manhattan Company was born.

The bank was only the second chartered bank in all of New York City, spicing up the Big Apple’s financial sector with the Bank of New York’s first real competition. This was a major source of contention among its founders, because Hamilton was also a founding shareholder of the Bank of New York.

This ad for The Bank of The Manhattan Company appeared in a New York newspaper in late 1799. Image credit: JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Upon the charter’s approval, Hamilton left The Manhattan Company to protect his own interests. Shortly thereafter, in 1804, the tension between Hamilton and Burr came to a head during an infamous duel from which Burr emerged the victor.

Roots of the Name

Fast-forward several decades, and the action continues, though it’s accompanied by fewer violent rivalries.

Drexel Morgan & Co., a private merchant banking partnership, was founded by J. Pierpont Morgan and Anthony Drexel in 1871. A few years later, in 1877, John Thompson formed Chase National Bank, named in honor of Lincoln’s Secretary of Treasury, Salmon P. Chase, sowing yet another seed in the garden that would one day become Chase Bank.

Drexel Morgan & Co. made a particularly notable impact from the get-go, providing key funding during the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad (1880), the financial panic of 1908, World War I, and even a portion of Charles Lindbergh’s historic transatlantic flight.

Financial Forces Unite

Though it’s clear from their names alone that both Drexel Morgan & Co. and Chase National Bank would eventually prove formative in the direction of what is now JPMorgan Chase & Co., the mergers that solidified the company as a lone financial superpower took place relatively recently.

In 1955, Chase National Bank merged with The Bank of The Manhattan Company, forming Chase Manhattan Bank.

Chase Manhattan debuted the Octagon logo in 1960, a design that’s still a fundamental part of the Chase brand today.

The influential Chase Octagon was designed by Chermayeff & Geismar, now known as Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv. Image credit: JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Then, skip to the end of the 20th century, and you’ll arrive in 1996, when Chase Manhattan was acquired by Chemical Bank.

At the time, Chemical was the nation’s third-largest bank. But despite Chemical Bank’s prowess, the resulting corporation ended up taking on the (arguably simpler and more accessible) Chase name.

Further growth quickly followed Chemical’s fateful acquisition of Chase Manhattan, with J.P. Morgan & Co. Incorporated merging with Chase Manhattan Corporation in 2000 and assuming the current name of JPMorgan Chase & Co. This merger united several of New York’s most revered financial institutions and increased Chase’s power even further.

Most recently, Chase acquired Bank One Corporation in 2004, and then Bear Stearns and Washington Mutual in 2008, expanding its retail presence all across the nation.

A History of Innovation

Over the course of the nation’s history, the institutions and organizations that would eventually become part of Chase played an integral role in helping the United States of America thrive.

In addition to those achievements already outlined, Chase predecessors financed a host of major undertakings, including the building of the Erie Canal (The Bank of The Manhattan Company), the Brooklyn Bridge (Brooklyn Trust Company), the Statue of Liberty’s pedestal (New York Security and Trust Company), and the Panama Canal (J.P. Morgan & Co.).

Chase forerunners also pioneered a host of advancements that pushed the world of finance forward.

Chase Manhattan Bank introduced New York City’s first retail charge account in 1958, for example, which debuted as the Chase Manhattan Charge Plan before it was rebranded as the Uni-Card.

Chemical Bank also broke barriers, installing the first U.S. cash-dispensing machine — the ATM’s precursor — at its Rockville Centre branch in 1969.

Chemical Bank’s cash machine heralded a new era of banking. Image credit: Phonecard Museum

Chase Today

At the time of publishing, JPMorgan Chase & Co. is America’s largest bank and the sixth largest bank in the world by total assets. Its reach stretches around the world, with a presence in more than 100 markets, and clients range from everyday individuals to prominent governmental agencies.

The company is a world leader in investment banking, but it’s also known for its personal banking services and products, including numerous personal credit cards, like the renowned Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card (Review) and Chase Sapphire Reserve® (Review).

With so many resources at its disposal, it’s not unlikely that JPMorgan Chase & Co. will continue to push the boundaries for years to come.

Not sure whether Chase business cards are the right fit for you? Browse the best credit cards, including picks from other big names, like Capital One, American Express, Discover, and more, to find something that fits your needs.

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